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Grammar Task - The 4 Sentence Types

GRAMMAR - WEEK 9

The Four Sentence Types

 

Every sentence serves one of four functions. It must either make a statement, issue a command, ask a question, or exclaim and emotion or idea. Because of this we can understand sentence type by looking at the function that the sentence serves.

 

Declarative Sentences (STATEMENTS)

Declarative sentences make statements. Most sentences are declarative. Declarative sentences always end with a period.

Examples
I like pizza.
This is easy.

In each of these sentences the speaker makes a declaration; hence, they are declarative sentences.

 

Imperative Sentences (COMMANDS)

Imperative sentences issue commands. In most cases, imperative sentences have no visible subject; rather, the subject is implied. Most imperative sentences end with a period, but they may also end with an exclamation point.

Examples

Stay in your seat.
When scanning for structure, we should first find the action or predicate, which is stay in the above sentence. Then, to find the subject, we ask ourselves, “Who should stay?” The answer is that You should stay. While you is never clearly stated in the sentence, it is implied; hence, in imperative sentences, the subject is often the implied you.

Don’t do that.
Again, we can ask ourselves, “Who or what shouldn’t do that?” The answer, of course, is you again, as the subject of an imperative sentence will usually be the implied you.

 

Interrogative Sentences (QUESTIONS)

Interrogative sentences ask questions. Because of this, all interrogative sentences end in a questions mark.

Examples
Do you want to study?
Where are you going?

In each case the speakers request information. Because of this both sentences end in question marks.

 

Exclamatory Sentences (EXCLAMATION)

Exclamatory sentences express excitement or emotion. Writers express the exclamatory tone when they end their sentences in exclamation points. Every exclamatory sentence should end in an exclamation point. Use exclamatory sentences sparingly as too much excitement may annoy the reader or listener.

Examples

That was awesome!
I’m sick of this!

Notice in each case that the sentence expresses an emotion. Exclamation point signal to readers that the speaker is yelling or exclaiming.

TASK 1 - WATCH THE VIDEOS

This is a 'watch and learn' lesson. CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW to jump to the Year 3 Grammar Zone and watch the 3 videos to do with what a sentence is and the main types.

 

If you have time, practice writing a few examples out to get the idea.

TASK 2 - TEST YOUR UNDERSTANDING

Using the document 'Task Sheet 1' below, try to identify the type of sentence being used and WHY you think this. Ten sentences to do.

TASK 3 - YOUR OWN SENTENCES FOR EACH TYPE

Using the template (Task 2) below, write out 8 sentences, 2 for each type of sentence and explain WHY the sentence you have written matches the type.

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