Menu
School Logo
Language
Search

Charlotte's Web - Wilbur's Loneliness Poem

ENGLISH- SUMMER TERM WEEK 5- CHARLOTTE'S WEB

This week our work will be based on Chapter 4. Unfortunately, things haven't got much better for Wilbur since Chapter 3. 

 

Your task by the end of the week is to have written a poem describing 'Wilbur's Loneliness'. There are lots of examples of previous children's work in the gallery below. 

 

We suggest that this work takes THREE sessions. 

 

SESSION 1- LISTEN AND CREATE A WORD BANK

In this first lesson, listen to Miss Manley read Chapter 4. Once you have finished listening to this start writing down words that describe how Wilbur is feeling. We suggest using the template below as it has a picture of Wilbur from this chapter which may give you some extra ideas. When you have written down as many words as you can use a thesaurus to find some more. Remember, when we are writing poetry the more word choices we have the better! Try to make sure all your ideas are relevant to how Wilbur actually feels in the book. For instance, the chapter is called 'Loneliness', so Wilbur probably isn't going to be happy! When you have finished choose 5 of your favourite words and give them a star. 

 

SESSION 2- PHRASE BANK

Now that you have a good collection of word choices, it is time to put them into some phrases. You could include similes, metaphors and some alliteration. You could even see if you can include a rhetorical question! Have a look at the examples below if you need any help getting started. It is your choice whether you write your poem in 1st person (as Wilbur) or 3rd person (writing about Wilbur). I When you are writing your phrases you can have a go at both but you must decide which one you will focus on for your poem. Try and create as many phrases as you can as this will give you more to choose from when you compose your poem in the next lesson. You can always listen to the chapter again and see if you can 'steal' any phrases from the text to help you. Before you finish this session, look through your phrases and see if there are any that can be improved even further. This could be by changing a word or adding extra detail. Again, at the end of the lesson choose your favourite 5 phrases and give them a star. 

 

SESSION 3- COMPOSING THE POEM

As you can see from our numerous examples, these poems don't have to be long. We suggest that you focus on writing a non-rhyming poem. However, if you would like to challenge yourselves you are more than welcome to have a go at an acrostic poem (see examples below). Remember, this poem is describing Wilbur's loneliness so choose your most emotive words and phrases to really make the reader feel sorry for Wilbur.  This doesn't have to be in chronological order of events in the book. Make sure you decide whether you are writing AS Wilbur or ABOUT Wilbur.  Try to make your poems at least 6 lines long. 

 

If you would like any further help or advice please contact your teacher. 

Chapter 4- Loneliness

Children's work from previous years

Wilbur's Loneliness - Poems by Year 3 for Home Learning Week 5 - Well Done!

Top